What Would Elinor Do?

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Sense and Sensibility IllustratedWe were delighted to have the Jane Austen Bicentenary Library edition of Sense and Sensibility featured this month by the Jane Austen Centre at Bath’s online magazine!

And since we had to make another bracelet (we had made our own on a whim) to photograph for the tutorial, we have a giveaway to celebrate this special issue: the bracelet we made in the tutorial, along with a copy of the Jane Austen Bicentenary Library edition of S&S: ebook or paperback–your choice. To enter the contest, leave a comment below, with a valid e-mail address in the e-mail address field (only the Editrix will be able to see it, and we need it to contact you should you win to find out where to send your prize). The bracelet is about seven inches long; if you need a bigger or smaller bracelet, we can remake it if you win, so don’t let that keep you from entering the giveaway. ETA: Please post your entry by 11:59 p.m. U.S. Eastern Time on Saturday, April 28! In other words, right before midnight, which is technically Sunday, April 29.

ETA: The ebook is available from your favorite ebook store (try searching on “Margaret C. Sullivan” or “Cassandra Chouinard” to find this particular edition) or directly from Girlebooks or Smashwords.

The paperback is available from Librifiles, the hard-copy publishing arm of Girlebooks. See the link for a 20% off code if you buy from Librifiles, and there is a link there to Amazon. It’s also available from B&N.

Thanks as always to Laura Boyle, editor of the JA Centre’s magazine, for featuring the book. It is always fun to have the opportunity to think about Jane Austen’s novels and to write about thinking about Jane Austen’s novels, if that makes sense!

12 thoughts on “What Would Elinor Do?

  1. Allison T.

    I’ve always liked Elinor, though sometimes in movie versions she is played as being rather dour. She is the real Grownup of the family, while Marianne and her mother are the uncontrolled teens. One assumes that her father must have been a sensible man.

    The illustrations to the new book look charming! Where will it be sold?

    Congratulations1

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    • The ebook is available from your favorite ebook store (you might have to search on my name or Cassi’s to find this particular edition) or directly from Girlebooks or Smashwords.

      The paperback is available from Librifiles, the hard-copy publishing arm of Girlebooks. See the link for a 20% off code if you buy from Librifiles, and there is a link there to Amazon. It’s also available from B&N.

      I should probably put all this stuff in the actual post, shouldn’t I? Yes, I should. πŸ™‚

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  2. Sansanee

    If the cover is any indication, I’m sure the other illustrations in the annotated S&S are as equally charming. But the annotations are definitely the main incentive! πŸ™‚

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    • I’m a big fan of Cassi so I’m always going to praise the illustrations. πŸ™‚ The cover illustration is Marianne taking a “delightful twilight walk” at Cleveland, and getting her stockings wet. *cue ominous music*

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  3. Bee MacW

    Recently one of my relatives did a John Dashwood number on me. Unfortunately, it wasn’t until much later that I thought of Elinor’s perfect zinger reply: “Indeed, brother, your anxiety for our welfare and prosperity carries you too far.” I admire Elinor, and I enjoy annotated editions of Austen’s novels, so I will add this new one to my reading list.

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  4. missyisms

    Your annotations look informative and helpful. Congrats on such a good job! Will you do this for any of Austen’s other books? Thanks.

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  5. Felicia

    Beautiful book, it would be a lovely addition to my Jane Austen collection. I can’t wait to see the rest of the illustrations.

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  6. Jane (too)

    The question with S&S is always “Which should you be?” as both heroines turn out well in the end. I think Jane was telling us we should strive to be a little of both.

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  7. Lisa D

    I have always wanted an annotated JA novel, and would certainly like to have one annotated by you, Mags! (long time reader, first time poster) πŸ™‚

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  8. I’m an Elinor fan, always preferring her to Marianne and “esteeming” Edward more than do many fellow Janeites. The Bicentenary edition looks lovely and my Austen shelves are ready for a copy.

    The bracelet is a nice touch–just as I’ve always associated Elizabeth Bennett w yellow, so too have I long associated Elinor with blue–mayve it’s her calm exterior.

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