Pride and Prejudice to Be Adapted by Poldark Producers for ITV

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It’s been twelve years. We suppose it’s time for something new for everyone to fight over. Also, none of those pesky royalties to pay. PROFIT!

The producer, which also makes ITV smash hit Victoria starring Jenna Coleman, has commissioned acclaimed playwright Nina Raine – author of 2017 hit National Theatre play Consent – to adapt the classic novel, in a version that will aim to tease out the story’s “darker tones” according to Mammoth Screen. This will be Raine’s first TV adaptation.

“Pride and Prejudice is actually a very adult book, much less bonnet-y than people assume,” Raine said of the project. “I hope I do justice to Austen’s dark intelligence – sparkling, yes, but sparkling like granite.”

Meanwhile, at the fabulous high-tech AustenBlog World Headquarters…

Dorothy goes into the Editrix’s writing lair. She looks up reverently at the Cluebat of Janeite Righteousness on its shelf. She takes down the Cluebat carefully and blows off the dust.

She always knew its time would come again.

In the Robing Room, the Editrix puts on her war paint.

(Something we didn’t have in 2005…GIFs!)

Out of the Janeite Bubble

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By Jeff Kubina (Maryland Renaissance Festival) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

A couple of weeks ago we were having lunch, and had brought the book we were reading, Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld. A co-worker joined us, and asked what we were reading. 

Editrix: It’s a modern-set retelling of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.

Co-worker: Pride and Prejudice…which one is that?

Editrix, at a bit of a loss, not knowing how well she knew the novel: Er, well, it’s about Elizabeth, and Mr. Darcy, and, er, he’s proud, and she’s prejudiced…

Co-worker: Keira Knightley or Gwyneth Paltrow?

Editrix: Oh. Keira.

Co-worker: Cool.

It’s good to get out of the Janeite bubble sometimes. Things become so simple.

P.S. Hey Internet! What’s up?

Devoney Looser on Feminism in the 1995 Sense and Sensibility film in The Atlantic

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Sense and Sensibility and Jane Austen’s Accidental Feminists

This is a great article and you should read it. We disagree, of course, with the quoted assertion by Louis Menand that Colonel Brandon is dull in the book. Dude: he comes thisclose to running away with his teenaged love; he finds her in a spunging-house, rescues her and her illegitimate daughter, is with her “in her last moments,” and he adopts and raises the daughter; he fights a duel for pete’s sake. How is that dull? Is it the flannel waistcoat? Marianne Dashwood is supposed to be scornful of the flannel waistcoat because she is 17 and silly. What’s your excuse?

Incidentally, we saw the People’s Light stage production of Sense and Sensibility yesterday and enjoyed it very much! If you are in the Philadelphia area, we encourage you to check it out.

REVIEW: Love & Friendship

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landfposterLove & Friendship*, Whit Stillman’s adaptation of Lady Susan, has had its premiere at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival, and with the assistance of our friend Miss W., who lives in Utah (residents get early access to tickets), and frequent flyer miles, we were able to see it. We’ve been pretty excited about this movie since we first heard about it a few years ago, because we knew with Stillman at the helm, we were likely to get a film that was literate and funny and in the spirit of the original, and we are pleased to report that’s just what happened. Love & Friendship is a fast, funny film full of sparkling dialogue and sumptuous sets and costumes. It is fully worthy of Jane Austen’s genius, and we enjoyed it tremendously.  Continue reading

Love and Friendship has landed!

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The Editrix is, at present, on her way to the Sundance Film Festival to see Love and Friendship on Sunday night! Stay tuned to AustenBlog and our Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr pages for updates. (Everything will make it back here eventually.)

whit-stillman-love-friendship

The excitement is beginning…firstly, for those wondering when everyone not struggling through blizzards and airline terminals without charging stations (seriously? Did we slip back into the 1990s unawares?) to get to Utah will be able to see the film, it will stream on Amazon in the U.S. (it is not clear to us if that means only for those with a subscription to Prime, or if anyone can pay to rent it) and we believe will also have a theatrical run, probably at your local indie cinema. We can’t speak to other countries quite yet.

Vanity Fair also has an interview with Whit Stillman about the film.  Continue reading

Team O’Toole!Darcy, Represent!

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Darcy of Arabia. We're pretty sure we've read that fan fiction.

Darcy of Arabia. We’re pretty sure we’ve read that fan fiction.

We were amused by an article by Devoney Looser in The Independent in which she talks about the various adaptations of Pride and Prejudice over the years, and the various Mr. Darcys. Olivier vs. Rintoul vs. Firth vs. Macfadyen is old news, but Devoney mentions a planned 1974 big-screen adaptation that never got made, featuring Peter O’Toole (!!!) as Darcy and… no one in particular for Elizabeth. Now, had they been making the film ten years earlier, when O’Toole was fresh off Lawrence of Arabia, he would have been the Hottest Darcy Ever™ (sorry, Colin and Larry, but it’s true). In 1974? We don’t know. After one has played Mr. Chips, however brilliantly, can one believably play Mr. Darcy?

Why “Clueless” is the Best Jane Austen Adaptation

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Why “Clueless” is the Best Jane Austen Adaptation

“…read all of Northanger Abbey…as a commentary on fangirl culture” YES.