Jane Austen Travel Guide on Kickstarter

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Dutch Janeite, journalist, and photographer Karin Quint has put up a Kickstarter to have her travel guide, Jane Austen’s England, translated to English. If you pledge at least €20, you will receive a copy of the book (with an additional charge for shipping).

We know many Janeites are planning a pilgrimage to the UK to commemorate the bicentennial of Jane Austen’s death in 2017, so this book will come in handy.

They are very, very close to reaching their funding goal, and there’s a couple of days left to get in on it. We’ve backed this project–won’t you?

(And being from Philadelphia, we are on board with the Rocky references!)

UPDATE: The goal has been reached! But you can still get in on it, and get a book when it’s done.

Love & Friendship DVD/Blu-ray Out in September in U.S. and UK

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landfdvdThe title says it all…the DVD and Blu-ray of Love & Friendship is available for pre-order on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk. The discs will be available in the U.S. on September 6 and in the UK on September 26 (as promised by Whit Stillman).

If you do not live in the U.S. or UK, please be sure that the disc of your choice will work in your country before ordering.

DVD/Blu-ray at Amazon U.S.

DVD at Amazon UK

Blu-ray at Amazon UK

What Would You Write to Jane?

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By Petar Milošević (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

We heard from Gabrielle, who has started a very interesting website called the Dear Jane Project. We will let her tell you about it in her own words.

I know exactly the ways in which Jane Austen has affected my life. I am very interested in knowing how Jane has had an impact on everyone else. I propose to start a collaborative blog. I have created a blog titled “Dear Jane Project”: https://dearjaneproject.wordpress.com. Someone who is interested in participating in this project can submit a letter to Jane explaining how her works and her life have affected them through an email: dearjaneproject@gmail.com. Submitted texts will be uploaded to the blog. Hopefully, this project will allow fans from around the world to share their stories, and create a community with people around the world.

I believe this project can become something great. Each one of us has a story, and my goal is for us all to be able to share them. I think it is a great way to commemorate the life of Jane Austen as we approach the 200th anniversary of her death.

What would you write to Jane?

We love the idea of this project and will be keeping an eye on the blog!

Your Sunday Austen Meditation

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Today’s lesson is from Mansfield Park, Volume I, Chapter XII, in honor of the holiday tomorrow in the U.S.; if memory serves, the only time Jane Austen mentioned our country in one of her novels.

Listening and wondering were all suspended for a time, for Mr. Bertram was in the room again; and though feeling it would be a great honour to be asked by him, she thought it must happen. He came towards their little circle; but instead of asking her to dance, drew a chair near her, and gave her an account of the present state of a sick horse, and the opinion of the groom, from whom he had just parted. Fanny found that it was not to be, and in the modesty of her nature immediately felt that she had been unreasonable in expecting it. When he had told of his horse, he took a newspaper from the table, and looking over it, said in a languid way, “If you want to dance, Fanny, I will stand up with you.” With more than equal civility the offer was declined; she did not wish to dance. “I am glad of it,” said he, in a much brisker tone, and throwing down the newspaper again, “for I am tired to death. I only wonder how the good people can keep it up so long. They had need be all in love, to find any amusement in such folly; and so they are, I fancy. If you look at them you may see they are so many couple of lovers–all but Yates and Mrs. Grant–and, between ourselves, she, poor woman, must want a lover as much as any one of them. A desperate dull life hers must be with the doctor,” making a sly face as he spoke towards the chair of the latter, who proving, however, to be close at his elbow, made so instantaneous a change of expression and subject necessary, as Fanny, in spite of everything, could hardly help laughing at. “A strange business this in America, Dr. Grant! What is your opinion? I always come to you to know what I am to think of public matters.”

Mr. Bertram was possibly referring to the War of 1812, which would have been going on while Jane Austen was writing Mansfield Park. This is a funny little moment, and Fanny laughing at Tom’s awkward predicament makes her seem a little more human than she is sometimes perceived. Here endeth the lesson.

Had She Been In Love

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Something pretty to start off a long weekend here at AustenBlog World Headquarters…a rehearsal of the song “Had I Been In Love” (a/k/a Lizzy’s Big Epiphany) from Austen’s Pride: A New Musical of Pride and Prejudice, coming up at the Nazareth College Arts Center in Rochester, NY, this month. The performers are Heather Botts as Elizabeth Bennet and Lindsie VanWinkle as Jane Austen. Yes, this is the P&P musical we’ve seen several times and been loving for years…the title has been changed to distinguish it from the several other P&P musicals around.

 

Jane and Her Majesty

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We’ve discussed this a bit on social media, but felt the occasion presented an opportunity for some snark would make a good blog post.

Alexandra Knatchbull, daughter of Lord Brabourne, great-granddaughter of Lord Mountbatten, and goddaughter of Diana, Princess of Wales, was married last weekend in what was described as “the society wedding of the year.” The wedding was covered by the press probably mostly because Her Majesty the Queen and other members of the British, Spanish, Greek and Jordanian royal families were guests.* The Prince of Wales gave away the bride as Lord Brabourne, one of the Prince’s best friends, was unable to do so due to illness, or at least that’s the official line.

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None of the press coverage of the wedding seems to have picked up the most important fact for Janeites–that the bride is descended from Jane Austen’s brother Edward Austen Knight. Continue reading

An Interview with Whit Stillman

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This interview is part of the Love & Friendship Janeite Blog Tour celebrating the release of the novelization of the film Love & Friendship, itself an adaptation of Jane Austen’s novella Lady Susan. We conducted it in the spirit of the novel (check out the link to Austenprose above for more information about it) and Mr. Stillman was kind enough to play along. 

Sir:

We have read Mr. (or should it be Signor?) Martin-Colonna’s little effort in refuting what he considers libelous untruths about Lady Susan Vernon. Firstly, we feel that we must register a protest in defense of the Divine Goddess whom Mr. Martin-Colonna has been pleased to refer to as the Spinster Authoress, being a member of that race ourself. We Spinster Authoresses must not desert one another; we are an injured body.

Mr. Martin-Colonna being a man, he very possibly does not understand his privilege: Men have had every advantage of women in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. Thus, women have had a disadvantage from the beginning, and we think deserve some protection from such boldly offensive behavior as Mr. Martin-Colonna’s towards Miss Jane Austen.

Also it seems to us that the “Spinster Authoress” upon whom Mr. Martin-Colonna has heaped such scorn would have pointed out that he (that is, Mr. Martin-Colonna), like many men, at least when it comes to Lady Susan, tends to use a different organ for thinking than that which the Creator provided for the purpose. But perhaps we are speaking out of turn.

And now to the questions for Mr. Whit Stillman, whom we presume to be the editor of Mr. Martin-Colonna’s energetic defense of his aunt, Lady Susan.

An Initial Reply:

First, in the way of a preface, I have greatly enjoyed following my interlocutor on twitter and blog. [*blush* –Ed.] Those working on the film found especially helpful the wealth of research and insight on the websites devoted to Jane Austen and to the Georgian and Regency eras. Continue reading